Getting to the Point

The Chinese believe that life energy flows over and into the body through meridians.  Meridians can be stimulated with needles to adjust and balance the flow of energy, allowing the body to heal.  Many studies have shown acupuncture releases endorphins and other neuro-transmitters that help relieve pain, stimulate the immune system and improve organ function.  Acupuncture has been used medically for that past 4,000 years to treat humans, yet in the past few decades acupuncture has become more popular in treating disc disease, kidney failure, heart and lung disease and virtually any other chronic diseases in animals.  

If you would like to know more about acupuncture and how it could benefit your four- legged friend, please schedule a consultation at The Colony Animal Clinic today!! 

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a non-traditional form of medicine of Eastern origin. It is based on the principle of restoring the body's balance using very fine needles placed in certain acupuncture points. Dogs have over 150 of these acupuncture points. In pets, acupuncture is most commonly used for pain management and to treat diseases of the kidney, liver and skin.

Acupuncture has so many potential benefits and has very minimal chances of creating any adverse effects. Acupuncture causes the body to produce more of its own innate pain-killers and feel-good hormones, such as endorphins and seratonin. Acupuncture releases muscle spasms, promotes blood circulation, and stimulates the immune system to clean up the body. Patients are visibly more calm after acupuncture treatments, can walk better, generally seem more alert and engaging with their eye contact, sleep and eat better. 

With acupuncture, you can re-balance the entire body. 


Here is a list of areas that respond favorably to acupuncture.

MUSCULO-SKELETAL
This is the area most commonly treated with acupuncture in western medical practice. Quite a few veterinarians limit themselves to the treatment of arthritic disorders or muscular injuries, ignoring the many other conditions and illnesses which can benefit from acupuncture.

GYNECOLOGICAL
All female reproductive conditions are acknowledged to respond to acupuncture treatment including anestrus, metritis, dystocia, retained placenta, agalactia, mastitis and mesalliance.

MALE REPRODUCTIVE
Impotence, orchitis, epididymitis, and libido can be successfully treated.

HORMONAL
Almost all of the hormonal systems can be affected, including all of the pituitary functions, thyroid and parathyroid functions, and adrenal functions. It is also possible to normalize blood sugar levels.

NEUROLOGICAL/PSYCHOLOGICAL
Anxiety, epilepsy and behavioral disorders have all responded well to acupuncture treatments.

DERMATOLOGICAL
The skin can tell us if our pet is getting proper nutrition and how well they’re disposing of waste through the respiratory, digestive and urinary systems. If an acupuncturist can keep these organs and systems in good condition this will be reflected in the skin.

PERFORMANCE
Acupuncture is being used to indirectly influence the performance of a dog or horse. It’s best not to use acupuncture 48 to 60 hours before a race due to the sedating effect. After 48 hours or so there is an increase in vigor, vitality, and a general feeling of well-being.

Chinese Herbal Medicine 

If we observe animals in their natural habitat we’ll see that they are instinctually drawn to specific herbs. The field of Zoopharmacognosy has demonstrated this to be true. From our kitchen to our back yards nature has provided us with a constant reminder that all we need to heal and soothe our pets and ourselves is well within reach. After all, 25% of conventional pharmaceuticals are derivatives of plants.

The Chinese divide herbs into three simple categories. This is a good starting point for identifying specific characteristics for individual herbs. Of course some herbs will work differently on a dog or cat. For instance Catnip is a stimulant and aphrodisiac for a cat as opposed to a sedative when given to humans in the form of tea.

1. Poison herbs. These are extremely powerful herbs that have very specific benefits. They are only to be used for short periods of time and have very strict rules for application and quantity.
2. Medicinal herbs. These are also quite strong and are used for a specific medicinal purpose, but here there is a wider margin for error.
3. Food herbs. These are the gentlest of the three and can be used indefinitely without any harmful effects.

Herbs and plants can be antimicrobial, anti-cancer or boost the immune system. Some plants can help strengthen the body and relax the mind. Herbs can be brewed into tonics and teas that have a variety of fortifying effects on the body as a whole. Herbs can be integrated into conventional medical treatments with the help of an enlightened veterinarian. Pet owners can educate themselves as much as possible about herbalism so that they know what particular herbs may be useful in treating the condition or illness their pet may be experiencing.

The Colony Animal Clinic, 5906 Paige Rd. The Colony, TX 75056               Phone: (972) 370-5220